kj : schnibbles of my life

My grandfather always used the word "schnibbles" to describe the bits of things on the floor, or bites of snacks that you sneak. Sometimes that's all I can get organized to keep in one place. Schnibbles.

Visit my knitting pattern shop at Ravelry: http://www.ravelry.com/designers/kirsti-johanson

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A little piece of yourself DOES go into everything you knit!

Always stylish.

knittingcountess:

acalmstrength2013:

Have you guys checked out Botanical Knits 2 by Alana Dakos yet?  It’s full of so many pretty patterns!  Pictured above:

Verdure fingerless mitts

Twigs and Willows mitts

Sunlit Autumn sweater

Ivy Trellis hat

Flourish sweater

Forest Foliage wrap

Sprig Sweater

Ferns hat

Hanging Leaves wrap

Aren’t they all lovely?  There are a few more (equally beautiful) patterns in the collection as well.

I have not yet, but I certainly plan to do so!

I love Alana Dakos’s work!

(via knittinginthedesert)

Happy Spring! My yard is looking alive

For those of you keeping score, not only am I quirky as hell, genuinely pretty content and positive, and not cool on most traditional measures of popularity … I am also not a hipster.

authorsarahdessen:

sesamestreet:

Earth Day!

Paul Rudd is good looking even dressed as a planet. 

smokey-bear:

For Earth Day, I commit to protect the climate. Take small actions that add up! #ActOnClimate http://thndr.it/1hw7ioo

Me too, Smokey Bear.

scienceyoucanlove:

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!

IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.

Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.

If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
  • Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
  • If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
  • See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.
If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions
PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.

Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.

Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.

If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

So I searched a bit and found that this was a thing, please be careful! (http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/39809.html for more info)

Oddly enough, I just checked the DNR site to see if it’s been reported in WI.  (only in 3 counties)  http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/Invasives/fact/gianthogweed.html

(via penaltybox14)

So I took this quiz….

authorsarahdessen:

rebeca-polley:

Bunnies from Brickflow

Happy Easter, y’all. 

Bunnies!!!